General Care Discussion :: Turtle Limb Redness?

Taking care of your turtle's overall health.

Post Posted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 2:10 pm   Turtle Limb Redness?

This is my turtle, he has his feet out which is very unusual
Image


The turtle broke a nail, so I dry docked him and let it into the water for two hours for two times a day, wound cleaned with iodine

and i see him getting better after 5 days

so i put him in his usual tank again

as soon as i put him in for two days the redness appears in both of his feet and his claws, its a little bit pinkish around his eye too

The tank is disinfected with clean water as well

Also, I wonder how I can make it show its leg and hand so i can put med in it? It shrink it's hands and feet into its shell all the time and I cannot do anything.

I did not see anything about this in the caresheet so I wonder what I should do, Is is life threatening?

Since the turtle is pretty restless, I could only take videos for its claw, its claw is red inside
https://b.catgirlsare.sexy/sEJE.mp4

Close up of his feet:
Image
Image

Close up of his face, nose is a bit pinkish:
Image
suzanna8767
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Jun 5, 2017

Post Posted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 2:20 pm   Re: Turtle Limb Redness?

Does my turtle have Septicemia !?
suzanna8767
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Jun 5, 2017

Post Posted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 5:46 pm   Re: Turtle Limb Redness?

A little pink around the webbing and where the skin/shell meet is normal. Some shedding skin might also have a slight pink tinge (from bacteria). Looks OK from the photos, but looks more reddish in the video?
User avatar
steve
Site Admin
 
Posts: 29026
Joined: Apr 11, 2005
Location: New York, NY
Gender: Male

Post Posted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:01 pm   Re: Turtle Limb Redness?

steve wrote:A little pink around the webbing and where the skin/shell meet is normal. Some shedding skin might also have a slight pink tinge (from bacteria). Looks OK from the photos, but looks more reddish in the video?

Yes, it is quite reddish
It changes from time to time as well, sometimes it is pink, sometimes its reddish
Sometimes the neck turns a pink tinge too and after a few minutes it fades
How it appears is totally random and I have no clue what is going on with my turtle :(
suzanna8767
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Jun 5, 2017

Post Posted: Sat Jun 24, 2017 5:45 am   Re: Turtle Limb Redness?

suzanna8767 wrote:
steve wrote:A little pink around the webbing and where the skin/shell meet is normal. Some shedding skin might also have a slight pink tinge (from bacteria). Looks OK from the photos, but looks more reddish in the video?

Yes, it is quite reddish
It changes from time to time as well, sometimes it is pink, sometimes its reddish
Sometimes the neck turns a pink tinge too and after a few minutes it fades
How it appears is totally random and I have no clue what is going on with my turtle :(





Changing from time to time was going to be my question ! RES's have really bad circulation. Basking or when sleeping their blood can pool under the skin. Especially in small habitats where little room to move around in , that's one reason I offer the largest home I can. I even offer a baby the adult size home. At least 10 gallons for every inch of shell. This poor circulation gives the pinkish or reddish appearance . Once they start moving around it normally starts to disappear or change as you are noticing. Also diets can effect color to a point. Some foods have color enhancers which I stay away from.

Found this I thought was a good idea how blood flows works when it bypasses the lungs when inactive.

CIRCULATORY
Like amphibians, the circulatory system in reptiles consists of a CLOSED TWO LOOP SYSTEM and a THREE CHAMBER HEART surrounded by a PERICARDIAL MEMBRANE. Locate the RIGHT ATRIUM, LEFT ATRIUM, and VENTRICLE. The SINUS VENOSUS and CONUS ARTERIOSUS ARE SMALLER THAN IN AMPHIBIANS. In fact the SINUS VENOSUS is even absent in some species. The CONUS ARTERIOSUS forms the base of the 3 large arteries leaving the heart.

The PULMONARY CIRCULATION carries deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs, then returns oxygenated blood to the heart. The SYSTEMIC CIRCULATION carries oxygenated blood from the heart to the muscles and body organs and brings deoxygenated blood back to the heart. Blood going to the kidneys (RENAL circulation), to the liver (HEPATIC circulation), and blood that supplies the heart itself (CORONARY circulation) are special parts of the SYSTEMIC loop. Remember adding a second loop has the advantages of FASTER BLOOD FLOW to the body organs and MORE EFFICIENT delivery of oxygen.

Low oxygen blood returning from the body enters the SINUS VENOSUS. From there it enters the RIGHT ATRIUM. At the same time high oxygen blood returning from the lungs enters the LEFT ATRIUM. When the atria contract, both kinds of blood are sent to the VENTRICLE. The turtle heart is different from that seen in frogs. In most reptiles a PARTIAL SEPTUM appears to separate the ventricle to further prevent mixing to the HIGH and LOW oxygen blood that shares this pumping chamber. (In Crocodilians this septum divider is complete making crocodilians the only reptiles with a 4 chamber heart.) When the ventricle contracts, both kinds of blood pass through the CONUS ARTERIOSUS,which has a valve to prevent mixing of high and low oxygen blood. Large arteries then carry the high oxygen blood out to the body organs and muscles and low oxygen blood is sent to the lungs to pick up oxygen.

The reptile circulatory system has a flexibility that amphibians, birds, and mammals do not. Pumping blood through the lungs requires energy. Under some circumstances it is advantageous for a reptile to divert blood away from the lungs to conserve energy.

There are times when a reptile may want to save energy by bypassing the lungs
1. when it is inactive (may go a long time without breathing)
2. when holding breath underwater
3. when they want to warm up fast

By constricting the blood flow to the pulmonary arteries, a reptile can redirect blood to the body and bypass (SKIP) the lungs to save energy. Bypassing the lungs can also help a reptile raise its body temperature quickly because warm blood from the skin can be directed to the organs deep inside.
litefoot
 
Posts: 1142
Joined: Nov 7, 2016
Location: New Orleans
Gender: Male

Post Posted: Sun Jun 25, 2017 9:36 pm   Re: Turtle Limb Redness?

My turtle had sepsis and it was pretty apparent. She had pink between her toes, HOWEVER that is not a reliable indicator.
When a turtle has sepsis the skin will look like bubble gum pink. The areas that are most concerning would be the around the neck and inner arm/shoulder area and the plastron. The seams of the plastron may look pinkish and the plastron itself may look pink as well.

Here is a link to my post from way back that shows examples of what a bad case of sepsis looks like.
a) ignore the note in the post about the pink between the toes - don't want to scare you.
b) the sample pics are from some other turtle; look for the tell tale shade of pink, not necessarily the extent.
c) sepsis does not come and go, so the pink color will be there regardless. It may be lighter or darker, but it won't go away completely and come back later.

Hope this helps to put your mind at ease through process of elimination of symptoms.
viewtopic.php?f=5&t=31346
"I know up on the top you are seeing great sights, but down at the bottom we, too, should have rights"
~ "Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories" by Dr. Seuss ~
User avatar
penelope
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: Oct 17, 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Gender: Female

Post Posted: Mon Jun 26, 2017 2:39 am   Re: Turtle Limb Redness?

Suzanna if it was my Piggley for peace of mind I would have him checked by a good Herp Vet , the only way to know for sure is a blood test !
It's better to be cautious ! My Piggley is a family member.
litefoot
 
Posts: 1142
Joined: Nov 7, 2016
Location: New Orleans
Gender: Male


Return to General Care Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Majestic-12 [Bot] and 8 guests